Photo 21 Apr 9 notes milos-garden:

Jeffersonia dubia. The leaves on this twin leaf are especially red from cool night temperatures, it makes a wonderful contrast with the blue flowers.

milos-garden:

Jeffersonia dubia.

The leaves on this twin leaf are especially red from cool night temperatures, it makes a wonderful contrast with the blue flowers.

Photo 20 Apr 1 note April, 2014

April, 2014

Photo 20 Apr 3 notes
Video 27 Mar 22 notes

landscapefocused:

Private Garden Tour in Germany

/ Photos by S. Schneider. More images and info on
Wildwuchs unter Aufsicht
. /


What I like the most about this garden is the feeling of disorder within a carefully designed environment. The combination of wooden table and chairs is astonishing, especially when watching it from the window.

s i m i l a r: Forest Floor Gardening / A vintage green by Emma Williams / A sense of place by Lauren Hall-Behrens
Photo 1 Mar 31 notes oldcourtdesign:

Helens from rice, Narcissus romieuxii
mmmmm, nice

oldcourtdesign:

Helens from rice, Narcissus romieuxii

mmmmm, nice

Photo 25 Feb 33 notes milos-garden:

British Columbia Native Plant of the Day: Angelica lucida Hardiness Zone: 4-8Common names: seacoast angelica; sea-watchFrom the carrot/parsley family this is one of the four Angelicas native here. Grows in coastal areas, either on the beach or up bluffs, or in moist meadowland. Common the entire length of the coast and on Vancouver and Queen Charlotte islands, rare inland populations. From Eurasia across to Alaska, Yukon, NWT, and down into California. Rarer but also found on east coast.   Known for its umbel flowers.           Photo from Wiki Commons Authors: Gordon Leppig & Andrea J. Pickart, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex

milos-garden:

British Columbia Native Plant of the Day: Angelica lucida

Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Common names: seacoast angelica; sea-watch

From the carrot/parsley family this is one of the four Angelicas native here. Grows in coastal areas, either on the beach or up bluffs, or in moist meadowland. Common the entire length of the coast and on Vancouver and Queen Charlotte islands, rare inland populations. From Eurasia across to Alaska, Yukon, NWT, and down into California. Rarer but also found on east coast.   

Known for its umbel flowers.           

Photo from Wiki Commons Authors: Gordon Leppig & Andrea J. Pickart, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Video 23 Feb 106 notes
Photo 16 Feb 76 notes orchid-a-day:

Mystacidium gracile
Syn.: Aeranthes gracilis
January 30, 2014

orchid-a-day:

Mystacidium gracile

Syn.: Aeranthes gracilis

January 30, 2014

Photo 13 Feb 433 notes plantfag:

Anguloa uniflora (Orchidaceae) by Tim Waters on Flickr.
Photo 4 Feb 11 notes milos-garden:

British Columbia Native Plant of the Day: Dicentra uniflora Hardiness Zone: 4-8Common names: longhorn steer’s-head; steer’s headThe lesser known of the two species of bleeding heart native to BC. It grows on dry, gravelly slopes and open meadows at higher elevations. Only found in the southern interior and then down into much of the Western United States.         Known its flower which somewhat resembles a cattle skull. It has small but pleasant ferny foliage growing from underground fleshy roots.   Photo from Wiki Commons Author: Wallace Keck

milos-garden:

British Columbia Native Plant of the Day: Dicentra uniflora

Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Common names: longhorn steer’s-head; steer’s head

The lesser known of the two species of bleeding heart native to BC. It grows on dry, gravelly slopes and open meadows at higher elevations. Only found in the southern interior and then down into much of the Western United States.         

Known its flower which somewhat resembles a cattle skull. It has small but pleasant ferny foliage growing from underground fleshy roots.   

Photo from Wiki Commons Author: Wallace Keck

Video 2 Feb 37 notes

mamisgarden:

hyggehaven:

Propagating cuttings in a plastic container: plug and forget method

By ladylotus Z3/4 ND on Sat, Oct 15, 11 at 10:47, GardenWeb Forums

I have 20 acres with approx. 3 acres of gardens. In order to fill up all my gardens I had to take a lot of cuttings. I have an easy fail proof way of taking cuttings.

1. Buy a plastic tote with a lid. Preferably as clear plastic as you can get.

2. Then I fill about 2 to 3 inches of soilless medium. (ie. 1 part peat moss and 1 part perlite).

3. I then make the medium damp, not soggy, but it does have to be damp through and through (peat takes a bit of time to absorb water…remember that). For the size container I have in the below photo, I use one full ice cream bucket of rain water or pond water, and that seems to be the perfect amount.

4. Dip your cuttings into the growth hormone, place them in the medium. I usually make my hole first with a pencil and then tamp the soil around the cutting a bit.

5. Place the lid on and forget them for several months. I do my cuttings in Oct or Nov and don’t remove the cuttings until May or June. I will peek in the container on occasion to ensure there is enough moisture in the mix.

aaah! yeah this method right here seems worth testing, it reminds of the method i used with the difference that mine weren´t covered.

i am a bit worried that the keept in moisture will do damage, if it freezes down. I would probably make a few drainage/moisturizing holes. Or maybe this is not meant for propagation in cold weather

Photo 12 Jan 18 notes neezieneezie:

winter garden no. 1 by juggzy_malone on Flickr.
Photo 11 Jan 138 notes followthewestwind:

(via Pinterest)
Photo 29 Dec 245 notes serafinoutsights:

Moss and grasses, for me they are two of the most amazing plants

serafinoutsights:

Moss and grasses, for me they are two of the most amazing plants

(Source: sweetlysurreal)

Video 22 Dec 5 notes

Christmas greetings 2013


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